Brand Archetypes Pill

9.99

Consumers tend to project their true or aspirational selves through their brands, and likewise, they tend to humanize brands to describe their differences beyond product attributes. Brand Archetypes are a construct to choose and develop a Brand Personality quickly. A 10 minutes pill, with theory and examples. Conveniently on-demand.

Category:

Key Features

Knowledge Pills - Target

Most helpful for:

Students, Brand Professionals, Agencies, Consultants.

Knowledge Pills - Benefits

Convenient & Accessible

At your own pace, short video that you can re-watch as many times as you want, for 30 days from purchase. Presentation included in the purchase, available for download in PDF format.

Knowledge Pills - Tech

On-demand

Video on Demand, based on Vimeo technology. Available 24h/7days. Accessible from any browser supported by Vimeo.

Key Reviews

Brand Archetypes: Objective

This pill aims to build a clear and practical understanding of Brand Archetypes and why they are essential.  Based on Jung’s work on personality archetypes, they are branding personality traits that are easily recognizable to consumers and even easier to relate to.

Pill Structure

  1. Archetypes: Definition and Context
  2. 12 Brand Archetypes
  3. Conclusions

Brand Archetypes: what for?

As we posit here:

The brand personality construct has deep origins in consumer behavior. In particular, consumers tend to project their true or aspirational self through their brands, and likewise, they tend to humanize brands to describe their differences beyond product attributes. The most common example is the personification of brands through celebrities, which is, of course, at the same time, a way for consumers to make sense of brands, but also a way for brands to signal to consumers a certain sense of belonging. In this sense, brand personality is at the core of celebrity endorsement and influencer marketing

The framework is a simple – yet powerful – tool to make sense of personality and express it in a way that consumers can easily relate to it. As a matter of fact, research supports the following conclusion:

They are an important part of brand personality. Marketing managers may use an archetypal approach to brand personality in order to define what a brand is, what it stands for, and the relationship with its consumers, thus providing a real meaning associated with their customers’ desires and motivation (Mirzaee, Sarah, and Babu P. George. “Brand archetypes: an experiment with the ‘demeter’.” Journal of Applied Economics and Business Research 6.2 (2016): 93-105.)